• Image size reduction by quality

    45% - 30KB

    You can speed up your website by reducing the size of images. You can reduce image size by adjusting the image quality. Do this before you upload the file!

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    Published:

    Last updated:

    February 6, 2021
  • Localization of Full Site Editing themes

    Full Site Editing - Localization of templates and template parts

    The WordPress Gutenberg project’s plan for internationalization (i18n) and localization (l10n) of Full Site Editing themes (FSE) has not yet been formulated. I’ve written a proposal, entitled Internationalization and localization: translating templates and template parts, raised as Feature request #27402.

    I believe that very little needs to be done to Internationalize a file containing Gutenberg blocks and HTML, and that it can be translated and localized into a statically delivered file in the user’s required locale ( language and country ) using the process described in the feature request.

    This post briefly discusses some of the challenges of translating rich text content.

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    Published:

    Last updated:

    December 6, 2020
  • Learning a PR process

    Git Workflow

    I’ve been using GitHub since October 2012 but until recently I’ve had very little understanding of any working process that enables me to contribute to other projects using Pull Requests ( PRs ).

    But now I’ve started to try to work with branches. Two reasons:

    1. To enable me to contribute to Gutenberg- for Full Site Editing improvements.
    2. To help others to learn about version control system by collaboratively developing repositories on wppompey.

    In this post I’ll document the process I’m using for developing PRs against Gutenberg issues.

    I read the instructions on WordPress.org. They all made sense, but I couldn’t work out how to create a PR that only contained the changes I’d intended to make. While the overall effect of my PRs were the change I intended, every Pull Request consisted of multiple commits, not just the one I wanted to apply. Obviously I was doing it wrong.

    I read some Stack Overflow items ( thanks Angel for directing me to them ) and discovered the git commands that appear to do the job.

    I’ve now created 4 or 5 PRs using this method. And so far I’ve not had any problems. This is a good thing. I’ve just re-read the Git Workflow process and realised it’s almost exactly the same.

    The process

    Preparation – per repository

    1. Fork the repository in GitHub.
    2. Clone to the directory where you’re going to make your changes.
    3. Add the upstream repository.
    4. Fetch the latest versions.
    cd \apache\htdocs\wordpress\wp-content\plugins
    git clone https://github.com/bobbingwide/gutenberg.git gutenberg-source
    cd gutenberg-source
    git remote add upstream       https://github.com/WordPress/gutenberg.git
    git fetch --all
    

    For each Issue / PR

    Work in a new branch ( gpr.bat )

    git checkout -b fix/%1 upstream/trunk

    Now make and test changes in the new branch. Add files and commit as often as necessary, with a nice commit message, referencing the issue number each time?

    git commit -m "good commit message 50-70 characters

    When ready push the changes to your fork of the repository ( gpush.bat )

    git push -u origin fix/%1

    Theoretically this should work for any repository.

    Then change back to the main branch

    git checkout trunk

    Fetch all

    To keep the local repository up to date use fetch --all. I believe this has to be done in trunk.

    C:\apache\htdocs\wordpress\wp-content\plugins\gutenberg-source>
    git checkout trunk
    git fetch --all
     Fetching origin
     Fetching upstream
     remote: Enumerating objects: 3248, done.
     remote: Counting objects: 100% (3248/3248), done.
     remote: Compressing objects: 100% (273/273), done.
     Receiving objects: 100% (
     Receiving objects: 100% (4749/4749), 51.99 MiB | 3.85 MiB/s, done.
     Resolving deltas: 100% (3648/3648), completed with 996 local objects.
     From https://github.com/WordPress/gutenberg
    ...
    

    What I was doing wrong

    For the 150 or so GitHub repositories under bobbingwide I developed all my changes in the main branch. It’s still called master for many of them. Then I pulled the changes to a local version in C:\github\bobbingwide\repository-name and pushed them from there.

    I had two copies of each repository. One reason for this was protection against having the repository destroyed accidentally by WordPress updates or unpacking .zip files into other development enviroments.

    References

    https://developer.wordpress.org/block-editor/contributors/develop/git-workflow/
    https://developer.wordpress.org/block-editor/contributors/develop/

    [Read more…]


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    Published:

    Last updated:

    May 28, 2021
  • How to survive WordPress 5.5’s removal of jQuery-migrate

    The removal of jQuery-migrate from WordPress 5.5 broke a couple of my sites. Using the Enable jQuery Migrate Helper plugin helps you to survive the issue. But it just hides the underlying problems in the same way that WordPress core had been doing up until now.

    [Read more…]


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    Published:

    Last updated:

    August 25, 2020
  • SB Children block – my first Single Block plugin

    The SB Children bock plugin, which delivers a WordPress block called Children is now available in the WordPress Block Directory.

    [Read more…]



    Published:

    Last updated:

    August 9, 2020
  • Horizontally scrolling tables on narrow devices

    I’ve been looking at how to enable horizontal scrolling on tables created by the [bw_table] shortcode, when the device width is narrow. I want to be able to do it using CSS, without JavaScript. I also want to be able to style the table in the native Gutenberg blocks.

    Having looked at a couple of solutions, I believe I’ll be able to achieve it having the table nested in a Group block, and providing the CSS styling using my CSS block.

    [Read more…]



    Published:

    Last updated:

    June 29, 2020
  • oik-clone v2.0.0-beta-20200616 – cloning new content made easier

    Today, after many months of procrastination, I’ve implemented a small change to my oik-clone plugin that should significantly improve my publishing process. oik-clone now has the ability to automatically re-clone content with newly added (uncloned) featured images.

    The primary purpose is to ensure that the target system has the correct ID for the featured image.

    Original processNew process
    Create the content.Same
    Upload and attach the featured image.Same
    View the content.Same
    In the output of the [clone] shortcode select the post and the child attachment to clone. Click on cloneSame.
    Edit the content – check the SEO meta description, correct a typo or something, update the taxonomies then update.No need to edit. You’re done.
    View the content again.
    Clone the content again.
    Original process vs New process for cloning new content

    See bobbingwide/oik-clone#50.

    Clone/cloned output before cloning

    Post without a featured image. Note: post ID 50 was extracted from the github shortcode. It’s a red herring I’ve learnt to live with.

    Clone/cloned output after cloning

    [Read more…]


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    Published:

    Last updated:

    June 16, 2020
  • How to hide a WordPress Multi Site site

    Using a plugin called network-privacy you can hide a WordPress Multi Site site so that it’s only accessible to a particular type of user.

    You can use this if you want to create a staging / development site within a WordPress Multi Site network.

    [Read more…]



    Published:

    Last updated:

    June 15, 2020
  • How to remove /blog/ from WordPress Multi Site permalink structure

    If you’ve ever converted a single installation of WordPress into a WordPress Multi Site ( WPMS ) network using subdirectories, you’ll have noticed that the prefix for blog permalinks for the primary site changes from https://example.com/
    to
    https://example.com/blog/

    If you are concerned that this new permalink structure will cause problems in the future then you may choose to remove the blog/ part.

    It is possible to remove this prefix

    • Login as a Super Admin
    • Go to Network Admin -> Sites
    • Choose the Main site and click on Edit.
    • Choose the Settings tab
    • Find the Permalink Structure text field.
    • Remove the /blog text, leaving /%year%/%monthnum%/%day%/%postname%/
    • Scroll to the bottom and Save Changes.

    Why would you want to do this?

    • So that permalinks for blog posts remain unchanged.
    • Because you think it would be better for SEO.
    • To prevent broken links.

    Caveats

    Some people say that making this change is not recommended. The reason for adding the blog/ prefix is to prevent conflicts with URLs in other sites in the network.

    If you do this on the main site of your network, you must make sure that none of your posts, categories, tags, or custom post types and taxonomies have a slug equal to the slug of a subsite.

    I did this on a local install, creating a subsite called 2020. Then I forgot about it, updated to WordPress 5.5-beta3 and thought the hack had stopped working. I’m going to have to fiddle with the new sub-site’s name now.

    [Read more…]


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    Published:

    Last updated:

    July 23, 2020
  • WordPress is old

    WordPress was first released on 27th May 2003. It reached 17 years old on 27th May 2020. It’s rather popular you know. Here are a few of WordPress’s significant events from 2003 to the current day.

    [Read more…]



    Published:

    Last updated:

    May 27, 2020

Categories

Tide times from tidetimes.co.uk

Tide Times & Heights for Northney on
Saturday, 18 September 2021

Tide times from tidetimes.org.uk

Tide Times & Heights for Northney on
18th September 2021
03:20 Low Tide ( 1.03m )
11:04 High Tide ( 4.27m )
15:46 Low Tide ( 1.07m )
23:18 High Tide ( 4.26m )